Overview

The goal of the Consortium of Hybrid Resilient Energy Systems (CHRES) is to increase workforce pipeline of graduates ready to pursue a career in DOE and other STEM related fields. CHRES directly supports DOE’s goal of building a sustainable professional and academic pipeline of next the next generation of engineers and scientist from the Hispanic community, ready to take on the challenges of current and future energy systems.  CHRES efforts are to provide a year-round and summer research, internships, and co-ops for undergraduate and graduate students.  

 

 

About Us

The consortium participants are Universidad Ana G Méndez-Gurabo (lead), Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayaguez, University of Texas-El Paso, University of New Mexico- Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).  

 

Project Objectives

  • Provide research and educational experiences to minority students  by  continuing  and improving  the  consortium  programs.
  • Increase  interaction between partners and between partners and national laboratories.
  • Encourage minority students to excel in science, technology, engineering and math by providing them with practical experience and training through project capacity building and learning experience.
  • Enlarge scientific, technical knowledge and resource base in the topics of resilient energy (engineering).
  •  

Program Outcomes: 

  • Increase the number of students that perform research at all levels of participating institutions by 5% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the research products (paper, presentations) of minority students from partners by 5% in a five-year period).
  • Develop online courses related to field.
  • Increase the number of students participating in internships/direct hires at the National Laboratories by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of faculty members that work in/with the National Laboratories by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of technical visits from the National Laboratories to partner academic institutions by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of MSI students obtain practical experiences in engineering topics by 5%in a five-year period.
  • Increase number of students hired into engineering careers related to NNSA/DOE by 5% in a five-year period.  
  • Impact and secondary schools’ student to create interest in STEM fields.
  • Implement strategies that will increase enthusiasm of potential students into STEM fields.
  • Increase the number of extracurricular and innovative activities focused on resilient energy systems topics, such as summer internships, summer camps, tours and energy day to attract and retain students.
  • Offer research and work opportunities related to STEM field that will benefit current students by continuing to motivate them on completing their academic path.
  • Arrange outreach and networking strategies directed to attract new students.
  • Provide career placement opportunities for students.
  • Provide opportunities for students to work at National Laboratories and partnering institutions.

 

 

 

Opportunities 2021

Apply for this program (High School Energy Summer Camp 2021) before Friday, April 30, 2021.

 

Date: Mondays through Thursdays from June 7 to July 1, 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Four (4) weeks’ summer bridge program that will emphasize the development of competencies in energy systems with emphasis in resiliency and the challenges presented by human needs in the 21st century.  Students will have the opportunity of competing in the Engithlon Surviving Mode challenge.  There will be a prize for the team of students that develop the best idea to solve an energy related problem.

 

The application process is now open for 9th to 12th grade students. To apply click here (see Requirements and Application documents below).

Benefits

  • Prepare student for university work.
  • Exposition to formal courses (curricular component), seminars and workshops.
  • Competition Participation: Engithlon Surviving Mode

    • The best idea from the energy area will be chosen

    • Award and certificate for the best idea

 

Requirements

  • Be a student in good standing (students are not required to study engineering but should have an interest in sciences or engineering).
  • GPA (grade point average) of at least 2.50 / 4.0 ("por lo menos 2.50 de promedio acumulativo").

  • Devote, during Monday through Thursday, 6.5 hours during the months of June (7) to July (1) (4 weeks = 20 days).

  • Attend all courses and seminars and be on-time and participative.
  • Prepare presentations in one topic of energy based on literature research.

  • Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

(Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

 

Application

  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.

  2. Write a 1-page essay (must be in English, no less than 250 and no more than 500 words) discussing why do you want to participate in the High School Energy Summer Internship 2021, what do you expect to gain out of the experience, and how the experience will help you attain your academic goals and career plans.

  3. Copy of last Official transcripts (GPA evidence).

  4. Parents need to sign authorization for the student’s participation.

  5. Open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

 

Submit PDF files of these documents, via the web application
Documents and application must be submitted no later than Friday, April 30, 2021.

 

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.

 

 

Apply for this program (6 Weeks Summer Research Opportunity 2021) before Friday, April 30, 2021.

 

Six (6) weeks summer cutting-edge research experience in Energy Systems for Science and Engineering undergraduate students.
The application process is now open for UAGM's Undergraduate students.

 

To apply click here (see Requirements and Application documents below).

Benefits

  • Participate in cutting-edge research.

  • Participate in technical and professional skills seminars.

  • Develop professional network.

  • Students will receive a stipend.

 

Requirements

  • Be a student in good standing.

  • GPA of 3.00/4.00.

  • Work under the direction and supervision of a faculty researcher.

  • Devote at least 10 hours per week to research activities as instructed by faculty researcher.

  • Prepare and submit a final presentation and a paper report.

  • Attend seminars as requested.

  • Present research results.

(Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

 

Application

  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.

  2. Copy of unofficial transcripts.

  3. Copy of officialized enrollment.

  4. 1-page CV/Resume

  5. 2 names and contact email of professor's references

 

Submit PDF or JPEG files of these documents, via the web application.
Documents and application must be submitted no later than Friday, April 30, 2021.

 

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.

 

 

Apply for this program (Summer Exchange Research Program 2021) before Friday, May 21, 2021.

 

A summer cutting-edge research experience in Energy Systems for Science and Engineering undergraduate students.
The application process is now open for Undergraduate and Graduate students.

 

Universidad Ana G. Méndez Recinto de Gurabo

Project 1:  Development of Catalytic for Oxygen Reduction
PI: Dr. Lisandro Cunci
Student Preferred Qualifications: Major: Chemestry

 

Project 2:  Deployment of a Deep Learning Algorithm for fault detection in a Gas Turbine.
PI : Prof. Diego Aponte
Student Preferred Qualifications: Computer Engineering with knowledge in python, C, and C++

 

Project 3: “Design of photovoltaic systems, which includes: irradiance calculation, load calculation, storage system calculation, AC conversion and simulation.”
PI: Dr. Miguel Goenaga
Student Preferred Qualifications : Areas Power and Renewable Energy

 

Project 4: Implementation of Blade Pitch and Mechanical Braking Control for a Small-Scale Wind Turbine
PI: Prof. Albert Espinoza
The purpose of the project is to implement an effective autonomous control strategy for pitching the blades and applying a mechanical break to the generator shaft of a small-scale wind turbine to (1) optimize power generation under variable wind conditions, and (2) provide a safety mechanism to slow down the turbine under high wind conditions. The student(s) will have the opportunity to work hands-on with a small wind turbine to test out their control designs in hardware, if COVID-19 protocols permit.
Note: If COVID-19 protocols do not allow for in-person internships, the work can be carried out using a simulated model of a wind turbine using MATLAB and Simscape, which would have to be developed by the participating student(s). 
Student Preferred Qualifications: N/A

 

Project 5:  Microalgae as bioenergy factories: coupling production of oil and biogas from microalgae .
PI : Catalina Dávila Aguer, PhD
Student Preferred Qualifications: N/A

 

University of Texas-El Paso
Project 1: Risk and Resilience Metrics for Infrastructure Systems
PI: Dr. Yuanrui Sang
Student Preferred Qualifications: Junior, Senior or Graduate student classification in Electrical and Computer Engineering or related major

According to a report by the Department of Energy, severe weather is the leading cause of power outages in the U.S. Hurricane is one of the most predictable extreme weather events, and rich meteorological information, such as wind direction and speed, is forecasted and available to power system operators. However, preventive operation of power system in face of hurricanes is still largely based on engineering judgement, and the meteorological data are not fully utilized. In Dr. Sang’s research, an integrated framework for power system preventive operation is developed. This framework converts meteorological data into usable information for power system operators and provides an optimization-based tool for the operators to make decisions to reduce power outages during hurricanes while keeping the operating cost as low as possible.

This framework, first, employs weather forecast information, to estimate the damages to transmission system components. To do so, a structural model is developed, which analyzes the failure of transmission towers, due to the dynamic wind loading. The model estimates the likelihood of transmission line failure as a function of wind speed. The estimated failure probabilities are then explicitly modeled within the day-ahead security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC). Load shedding, in the SCUC formulation, is penalized at a high cost. Thus, the electric load will only be shed if the damaged network cannot support the delivery of energy to some location, or if such delivery is extremely costly.

Students that are part of this project will 1) develop a mathematical representation of this problem using a stochastic mixed-integer linear program, 2) familiarize themselves with a simple scenario reduction technique, and 3) make recommendations to improvement of system reliability.

 

Project 2: Microgrid Reliability and Optimization
PI: Dr. Sreenath Chalil Madathil
Student Preferred Qualifications: Junior, Senior or Graduate student classification in Industrial  or Systems Engineering or related major

Power system blackouts due to natural and human-made disasters are becoming ubiquitous and impacts the quality of life for millions of people. Such power outages cause substantial economic losses across the world. A network of microgrids is a potential solution to reduce the impact of such disruptions. Disaster struck communities require immediate power supply at evacuation places (such as schools, open shelters, fire and police stations) and healthcare facilities. The power distribution among these critical nodes depends on several factors, such as demand, disaster severity, and recovery time. Networked microgrids (NMGs) can help these "critical loads" to supply power during the adverse time. However, the reliability and resilience of these independent islanded microgrids may not be as high as the traditional power systems. Strategic networking and operation of these critical microgrids can substantially increase network resilience and improve the utilization of distributed energy resources. 

Students that are part of this project will 1) develop a mathematical framework to help the stakeholders decide the optimal locations for the "critical" microgrids in the networked MGs, 2) identify the ideal topology of these networks, and 3) develop optimal strategies for switching operations during usual as well as disaster operations.

Familiarity with programming, operations research, topology switching, thermal capacity, Ohms law, Kirchoff's current and voltage laws, energy storage devices, and renewable resources is desired.

 

Project 3: Engineering Education and Outreach
PI: Gabby Gandara
Student Preferred Qualifications: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior student classification in any Engineering or related major

UTEP College of Engineering currently has multiple ongoing outreach activities to local K12 campuses in the El Paso region. The annual Excellence in Technology, Engineering, and Science (ExciTES) Summer Institute, which offers inquiry-based and team-oriented projects and activities to students in grades third through 11th, begins offering sessions June 7, 2021, on the UTEP campus. The goal of ExciTES is to encourage students to use their knowledge, imagination and creativity, to solve specific challenges that will give them a better understanding of the different fields of engineering and to give them a start on their own paths to a career in engineering.

Students participating in the ExciTES Summer Institute, will work on a team that includes UTEP faculty and staff  in order to create Energy related inquiry-based and team-oriented projects activities. Students will also participate in the dissemination of various other projects related to various engineering fields and careers that will connect students to the 8 Bachelor of Science degrees offered through the UTEP College of Engineering.

 

Project 4: Renewable Energy and Advanced Energy Conversion
PI: Dr. Norman Love
Student Preferred Qualifications: Junior or Senior student classification in Mechanical Engineering or related major

Students will study the use of distributed renewables, specifically, concentrated solar power (CSP), when used in conjunction with advanced power cycles such as the Supercritical CO2 Brayton Cycle. The student will work to optimize the efficiency of the components and cycle. Software ASPEN Plus will be used to develop operational parameters that maximize the efficiency of the system for steady operational conditions. Student will also simultaneously develop transient models for the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle driven by CSP and capture the dynamics associated with weather variability.

Familiarity with thermodynamic cycles, fluid mechanics, fluid properties, turbomachinery, and renewable resources is desired.

 

University of New Mexico

Project 1: Hybrid Solar Desalination
Preferred Student Qualifications: Mechanical Engineer or Chemical Engineer, Senior Level or Graduate student level - Student will participate in an outdoor lab and also develop computer simulations. IN PERSON 

 

Project 2:Characterization of Quantum Dots for High Performance Solar Cells.
 Preferred Student Qualifications:  Electrical, Chemical, Mechanical Engineer, Physics - Senior Level or Graduate student level.  Indoor Lab. IN PERSON

 

Project 3: Hybrid Energy Systems for Remote Wireless Sensors
Preferred Student Qualifications: Electrical, Mechanical, Civil Engineer. Grad student level. IN PERSON possible.

 

Project 4: Developing Increased Frequency Bandwidth of Kinetic Energy Harvesting Devices.
Preferred Student Qualifications: Mechanical, Electrical Engineer with CAD experience. IN PERSON possible.  

 

Project 5: Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Storage.
Preferred Student Qualifications: Mechanical, Electrical Engineer.  IN PERSON possible. 

 

Project 6: Power Systems Protection and Control.
Preferred Student Qualifications: Electrical, Mechanical, Computer Engineering. Senior or graduate student level. IN PERSON possible. 

 

Universidad de Puerto Rico Recinto de Mayagüez

Project 1:  Wave and Tidal MHK Devices for Microgrids in Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico
PI: Dr. Eduardo Ortiz-Rivera & Dr. Erick Aponte-Bezares; Sandia Mentor: Dr. Rachid Darbali

 

This project focuses on the impact of integrating Marine Hydro Kinetic (MHK) devices in microgrids located in remote coastal areas such as the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. Each microgrid will presume a combination of generation assets such as wind, solar and storage. This will help answer the research question: What are the impacts of different MHK devices in a microgrid and what are some unexpected interactions that could occur when interacting with other distributed energy resources (DERs) in remote locations such as Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands?

This is achieved by developing dynamic simulation models of distribution systems in the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico as well as their generation sources using MATLAB/Simulink. Historical data collected by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing (CariCOOS) observation networks or model hindcasts for wind, solar and wave resources will be used as the input profiles for the energy generation models. This is approach will help study interaction with between MHK devices and their impact on microgrids as well as finding solutions to improve resiliency after devastating natural disasters for areas located in the coastal regions in the Caribbean. Results of the project will be presented in a format suitable for publication on applicable peer reviewed conference.

Student Preferred Qualifications: The posting is recommended for graduate and senior undergraduate students with dynamic simulation experience using Matlab and Simulink.

Program dates: May 31 until July 23, 2021.
This project is available only as a remote research experience. 


 

Project 2: Dynamic Modelling of Inverter Based Grid Support Functions in the context of standard UIA tests.
PI: Dr. Eduardo Ortiz-Rivera & Dr. Erick Aponte-Bezares; Sandia Mentor: Dr. Rachid Darbali
The purpose of this project is to develop simplified dynamic models of inverters with dq axis control strategies incorporating various GSFs.  Upon validation of the models, the goal is to evaluate the impact on UIA test dynamics under single or various GSFs and different aggressiveness settings.  Results of the project will be presented in a format suitable for publication on applicable peer reviewed conference.


Preferred Student Qualifications: The posting is recommended for graduate and senior undergraduate students with dynamic simulation experience using Matlab and Simulink and linear control systems theory.

Program dates: May 31 until July 23, 2021.
This project is available only as a remote research experience. 


 

To apply in any of the programs listed above, click here (see Requirements and Application documents below).

Benefits

  • Participate in cutting-edge research.

  • Participate in technical and professional skills seminars.

  • Develop professional network.

  • Students will receive a stipend.

 

Requirements

  • Be a student in good standing.

  • GPA of 3.00/4.00.

  • Work under the direction and supervision of a faculty researcher.

  • Devote at least 10 hours per week to research activities as instructed by faculty researcher.

  • Prepare and submit a final presentation and a paper report.

  • Attend seminars as requested.

  • Present research results.

(Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

 

Application

  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.

  2. Copy of unofficial transcripts.

  3. Copy of officialized enrollment.

  4. 1-page CV/Resume

  5. 2 names and contact email of professor's references

 

Submit PDF or JPEG files of these documents, via the web application.
Documents and application must be submitted no later than Friday, May 21, 2021.

 

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.

 

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