Overview

The goal of the Consortium of Hybrid Resilient Energy Systems (CHRES) is to increase workforce pipeline of graduates ready to pursue a career in DOE and other STEM related fields. CHRES directly supports DOE’s goal of building a sustainable professional and academic pipeline of next the next generation of engineers and scientist from the Hispanic community, ready to take on the challenges of current and future energy systems.  CHRES efforts are to provide a year-round and summer research, internships, and co-ops for undergraduate and graduate students.  

 

 

About Us

The consortium participants are Universidad Ana G Méndez-Gurabo (lead), Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayaguez, University of Texas-El Paso, University of New Mexico- Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).  

 

Project Objectives

  • Provide research and educational experiences to minority students  by  continuing  and improving  the  consortium  programs.
  • Increase  interaction between partners and between partners and national laboratories.
  • Encourage minority students to excel in science, technology, engineering and math by providing them with practical experience and training through project capacity building and learning experience.
  • Enlarge scientific, technical knowledge and resource base in the topics of resilient energy (engineering).
  •  

Program Outcomes: 

  • Increase the number of students that perform research at all levels of participating institutions by 5% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the research products (paper, presentations) of minority students from partners by 5% in a five-year period).
  • Develop online courses related to field.
  • Increase the number of students participating in internships/direct hires at the National Laboratories by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of faculty members that work in/with the National Laboratories by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of technical visits from the National Laboratories to partner academic institutions by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of MSI students obtain practical experiences in engineering topics by 5%in a five-year period.
  • Increase number of students hired into engineering careers related to NNSA/DOE by 5% in a five-year period.  
  • Impact and secondary schools’ student to create interest in STEM fields.
  • Implement strategies that will increase enthusiasm of potential students into STEM fields.
  • Increase the number of extracurricular and innovative activities focused on resilient energy systems topics, such as summer internships, summer camps, tours and energy day to attract and retain students.
  • Offer research and work opportunities related to STEM field that will benefit current students by continuing to motivate them on completing their academic path.
  • Arrange outreach and networking strategies directed to attract new students.
  • Provide career placement opportunities for students.
  • Provide opportunities for students to work at National Laboratories and partnering institutions.

 

 

 

Opportunities 2022

Apply for this program (High School Energy Summer Camp 2022) before Friday, April 15, 2022.

 

Date: Mondays through Thursdays from June 6 to June 30, 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Four (4) weeks’ summer bridge program that will emphasize the development of competencies in energy systems with emphasis in resiliency and the challenges presented by human needs in the 21st century.  Students will have the opportunity of competing in the Engithlon Surviving Mode challenge.  There will be a prize for the team of students that develop the best idea to solve an energy related problem.

 

The application process is now open for 9th to 12th grade students. To apply click here (see Requirements and Application documents below).

Benefits

  • Prepare student for university work.
  • Exposition to formal courses (curricular component), seminars and workshops.
  • Competition Participation: Engithlon Surviving Mode

    • The best idea from the energy area will be chosen

    • Award and certificate for the best idea

 

Requirements

  • Be a student in good standing (students are not required to study engineering but should have an interest in sciences or engineering).
  • GPA (grade point average) of at least 2.50 / 4.0 ("por lo menos 2.50 de promedio acumulativo").

  • Must complete 6.5 hours, Monday through Thursday during the internship from June (6) to June (30) (4 weeks = 20 days).

  • Attend all courses and seminars and be on-time and participative.
  • Prepare presentations in one topic of energy based on literature research.

  • Be an U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

(Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

 

Application

  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.

  2. Write a 1-page essay (must be in English, no less than 250 and no more than 500 words) discussing why do you want to participate in the High School Energy Summer Internship 2022, what do you expect to gain out of the experience, and how the experience will help you attain your academic goals and career plans.

  3. Copy of last Official transcripts (GPA evidence).

  4. Parents need to sign authorization for the student’s participation.

  5. Open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

 

Submit PDF files of these documents, via the web application
Documents and application must be submitted no later than Friday, April 15, 2022.

 

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.

 

 

Apply for this program (6 Weeks Summer Research Opportunity 2022) before Saturday, April 30, 2022.

 

Six (6) weeks summer cutting-edge research experience in Energy Systems for Science and Engineering undergraduate students.
The application process is now open for UAGM's Undergraduate students.

 

To apply click here (see Requirements and Application documents below).

Benefits

  • Participate in cutting-edge research.

  • Participate in technical and professional skills seminars.

  • Develop professional network.

  • Students will receive a stipend.

 

Requirements

  • Be a student in good standing.

  • GPA of 3.00/4.00.

  • Work under the direction and supervision of a faculty researcher.

  • Devote at least 10 hours per week to research activities as instructed by faculty researcher.

  • Prepare and submit a final presentation and a paper report.

  • Attend seminars as requested.

  • Present research results.

(Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

 

Application

  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.

  2. Copy of unofficial transcripts.

  3. Copy of officialized enrollment.

  4. 1-page CV/Resume

  5. 2 names and contact email of professor's references

 

Submit PDF or JPEG files of these documents, via the web application.
Documents and application must be submitted no later than Saturday, April 30, 2022.

 

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.

 

 

Apply for this program (Summer Exchange Research Program 2022) before Thrursday, March 31, 2022.

 

A summer cutting-edge research experience in Energy Systems for Science and Engineering undergraduate students.
The application process is now open for Undergraduate and Graduate students.

 

Universidad Ana G. Méndez Recinto de Gurabo

Project 1:  2D-Composites for the Development of Miniaturized Lithium-Ion Batteries (LIBs)
PI: Dr. Jose Duconge
Student Preferred Qualifications: Chemistry

 

Project 2:  Clear Energy from Rainwater
PI : Dr. Luz E. Torres Molina
Student Preferred Qualifications: Civil Engineering

 

Project 3:  Synthesis of nitrogen, phosphorus, and boron-doped onion-like carbon nanoparticles as support for non-precious metal electrocatalysts
PI: Dr. Lisandro Cunci
Student Preferred Qualifications: Major Chemistry

 

Project 4:  Fine[1]Tuning of Deep Learning Models for Detecting Abnormal Operation in a Gas Turbine
PI : Dr. Diego Aponte Roa
Student Preferred Qualifications: Electrical Engineering

 

Project 5: Increasing the efficiency of microalgae - based biofuel generation through a hybrid oil and biogas production system
PI: Dr. Catalina Dávila Aguer
Student Preferred Qualifications: N/A

 

Project 6: Construction and Integration of a Small-Scale Wind Turbine into a Benchtop DC Microgrid for Resiliency Studies
PI: Prof. Albert A. Espinosa
Student Preferred Qualifications: N/A

 

 

University of New Mexico
Project 1: Hybrid Solar Desalination
PI: Prof. Mohan (Mechanical Engineering Department)
Student will participate in an outdoor lab and also develop computer simulations.
Student Preferred Qualifications: Mechanical Engineer or Chemical Engineer, Senior Level or Graduate student level

 

Project 2: Characterization of Quantum Dots for High Performance Solar Cells
PI: Prof. Balakrishnan (Electrical & Computer Engineering Department)

Student Preferred Qualifications: Mechanical Engineer or Chemical Engineer, Senior Level or Graduate student level

Modality: Indoor Lab

 

Project 3: Hybrid Energy Systems for Remote Wireless Sensors
PI: Prof. Moreu (Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering Department)
Student Preferred Qualifications: Electrical, Mechanical, Civil Engineer. Senior or Graduate student level

 

Project 4: Developing Increased Frequency Bandwidth of Kinetic Energy Harvesting Devices
PI: Prof. Jackson (Mechanical Engineering Department) 

Student Preferred Qualifications: Mechanical, Electrical Engineer with CAD experience

 

Project 5: Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Storage
PI: Prof. Mohan (Mechanical Engineering Department)

Student Preferred Qualifications: Mechanical, Electrical Engineer

 

Project 6: Power Systems Protection and Control
PI: Prof. Jordan (Electrical & Computer Engineering Department)

Student Preferred Qualifications: Electrical, Mechanical, Computer Engineering. Senior or graduate student level

 

 

University of Texas-El Paso
Project 1: Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) of Metals
PI: Dr. Yirong Lin
Student Preferred Qualifications: Junior, Senior or Graduate student classification in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering or related major

FDM is one of the most popular additive manufacturing techniques. The process consists of material extrusion and layer deposition through a nozzle. This technology uses thermoplastic polymers that are both non-toxic & cost-effective materials. FDM novel techniques involve material extrusion of a filament blend of metal with a thermoplastic. Post-processing requires debinding of the thermoplastic and sintering for a fully dense metal print. In this project, you will be characterized, printing, and debind/sintering metal prints utilizing FDM technology.

 

Project 2: Selective laser sintering (SLS) postprocessing
PI: Dr. Yirong Lin

SLS is an additive manufacturing technique that uses a laser to sinter powdered material by focusing the laser at specific points in space which are defined by a 3D model, ultimately, binding the material together to create a sintered solid structure. In this project, you will be tasked with post-processing of the SLS procedure. This includes measuring, polishing and curing.
Student Preferred Optional Skill Sets:

  • Experience in working with FDM machines
  • Knowledge of CAD and G-code simulators
  • Demonstrates initiative, organizational skills and ability to work well under pressure.
  • Demonstrates ability to collaborate and work effectively in a team environment.
  • Possesses strong data analysis and problem-solving skills.
  • Proficient in the use of Microsoft Office applications including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint

 

Project 3: Selective Laser sintering of High-Temperature Thermoset Composites
PI: Dr. Yirong Lin

This work reports the SLS 3D printing of thermoset bismaleimide (BMI) resin to demonstrate its printability and thermal stability. The initial goal was to optimization of SLS printing parameters for BMI thermoset powder to get dimensionally accurate printed parts along with its successful curing process and we have successfully accomplished that. We quantified the degree of curing at different curing stages by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) run and prove significant improvement in mechanical properties after post-curing treatment. Additionally, this research demonstrates the printing and curing of Dynamic Mechanical Analysis [DMA] samples and performing tests to analyze the thermal stability by improving Glass Transition Temperature [Tg] point and exploring the damping factor. Now we are trying to print syntactic foam by blending Glass balloons and carbon balloons with BMI.
Student Preferred Optional Skill Sets:

  • CAD design

  • Basic knowledge on Additive Manufacturing

  • Knowledge on Mechanical testing and material science

 

Project 4: DOE Valve Project
PI: Dr. Yirong Lin

A prototype for a bypass valve has been designed that will be integrated into a system that will help to control the airflow going towards a Fuel Cell and Gas Turbine. Smart Materials such as shape memory alloys and micro-fiber composites will be integrated into this valve as actuators. For in-lab testing, materials that can handle temperatures up to 100 C have to be used. The goal is to make these smart materials able to work in a solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrid system, which reaches temperatures up to 650 C.
Problem-solving skills, Research skills,

Student Preferred Optional Skill Sets:

  • Fluid Dynamics

  • Thermodynamics and heat transfer knowledge

 

Project 5: Nanoindentation Project
PI: Dr. Yirong Lin

Nanoindentation enables the measurement of mechanical properties such as modulus of elasticity and hardness of materials in different shapes, sizes, and scales. The indentation test technique evaluates the mechanical properties of the specimens by diving an indenter tip into the specimen surface and then imaging the impression. The specimens tested in this project are 3D printed ceramics and polymers.

Student Preferred Optional Skill Sets:

  • Research skills

  • Analytic reasoning

 

Project 6: Decision-making algorithms for power system operations and planning to improve the resilience of power systems against natural disasters
PI: Dr. Yanrui Sang

According to a report by the Department of Energy, severe weather is the leading cause of power outages in the U.S. Hurricane is one of the most predictable extreme weather events, and rich meteorological information, such as wind direction and speed, is forecasted and available to power system operators. However, preventive operation of power system in face of hurricanes is still largely based on engineering judgement, and the meteorological data are not fully utilized. In Dr. Sang’s research, an integrated framework for power system preventive operation is developed. This framework converts meteorological data into usable information for power system operators and provides an optimization-based tool for the operators to make decisions to reduce power outages during hurricanes while keeping the operating cost as low as possible.

This framework, first, employs weather forecast information, to estimate the damages to transmission system components. To do so, a structural model is developed, which analyzes the failure of transmission towers, due to the dynamic wind loading. The model estimates the likelihood of transmission line failure as a function of wind speed. The estimated failure probabilities are then explicitly modeled within the day-ahead security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC). Load shedding, in the SCUC formulation, is penalized at a high cost. Thus, the electric load will only be shed if the damaged network cannot support the delivery of energy to some location, or if such delivery is extremely costly.

Students that are part of this project will 1) develop a mathematical representation of this problem using a stochastic mixed-integer linear program, 2) familiarize themselves with a simple scenario reduction technique, and 3) make recommendations to improvement of system reliability.

Student Preferred Optional Skill Sets:

  • Electirical or Computer Engineering or related major

 

Project 7: Developing decision support systems for energy resilience models for communities
PI: Dr. Sreenath Chalil Madathil

Power system blackouts due to natural and human-made disasters are becoming ubiquitous and impacts the quality of life for millions of people. Such power outages cause substantial economic losses across the world. A network of microgrids is a potential solution to reduce the impact of such disruptions. Disaster struck communities require immediate power supply at evacuation places (such as schools, open shelters, fire and police stations) and healthcare facilities. The power distribution among these critical nodes depends on several factors, such as demand, disaster severity, and recovery time. Networked microgrids (NMGs) can help these "critical loads" to supply power during the adverse time. However, the reliability and resilience of these independent islanded microgrids may not be as high as the traditional power systems. Strategic networking and operation of these critical microgrids can substantially increase network resilience and improve the utilization of distributed energy resources.

Students that are part of this project will 1) develop a mathematical framework to help the stakeholders decide the optimal locations for the "critical" microgrids in the networked MGs, 2) identify the ideal topology of these networks, and 3) develop optimal strategies for switching operations during usual as well as disaster operations. Familiarity with programming, operations research, topology switching, thermal capacity, Ohms law, Kirchoff's current and voltage laws, energy storage devices, and renewable resources is desired.

Student Preferred Optional Skill Sets:

  • Industrial or Systems Engineering or related major

  • Familiarity with:
    • Programming
    • Operations Research
    • Topology Switching
    • Thermal Capacity
    • Ohms Law
    • Kirchoff’s Current and Voltage Laws
    • Energy Storage Devices
    • Renewable Resources

 

Program dates: May 31 - August 6
Modality: In-Person
Availability: 9 students over 7 projects

 

 

Universidad de Puerto Rico Recinto de Mayagüez

Project 1:  Control of Hybrid Power System
UPRM Mentors: Dr. Eduardo Ortiz-Rivera & Dr. Erick Aponte-Bezares

The Consortium of Hybrid Resilient Energy Systems (CHRES) requires the services of a review and researching about specify project related to Control of Hybrid Power System. It is addressed to students doing bachelor’s or graduate degree studies (i.e. master or Ph.D.) at either CHRES partner academic intitution (i.e. UTEP, UAGM, UNM or UPRM). The guidelines for summer employment are required by the following list:

  • Intermediate knowledge of dynamic state-space representation and its functionalities.
  • Intermediate knowledge of Microsoft Word, Power point, MATLAB and Simulink.
  • Intermediate knowledge of writing projects in English.
  • Intermediate knowledge in Control Systems is a must.
  • Available to work in-class and/or online, 40 hours per week (8 hours every day).
  • Bilingual: English/Spanish.
  • GPA of at least 3.0/ 4.0.
  • Work under the direction and supervision of a UPRM CHRES's staff member.
  • Be an U.S. citizen.

Work Scheduled: It is expected that the outcome of these projects is given by the next list:
1. To expose two presentations, one based on project-advanced and another final project
2. To develop a paper related to project established jointly by the CHRES's staff member.


 

Project 2: Wave and Tidal MHK Devices for Microgrids in Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico
PI: Dr. Eduardo I. Ortiz-Rivera & Dr. Erick Aponte-Bezares; Sandia Mentor: Dr. Rachid Darbali
This project focuses on the impact of integrating Marine Hydro Kinetic (MHK) devices in microgrids located in remote coastal areas such as the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. Each microgrid will presume a combination of generation assets such as wind, solar and storage. This will help answer the research question: What are the impacts of different MHK devices in a microgrid and what are some unexpected interactions that could occur when interacting with other distributed energy resources (DERs) in remote locations such as Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands?

This is achieved by developing dynamic simulation models of distribution systems in the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico as well as their generation sources using MATLAB/Simulink. Historical data collected by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing (CariCOOS) observation networks or model hindcasts for wind, solar and wave resources will be used as the input profiles for the energy generation models. This is approach will help study interaction with between MHK devices and their impact on microgrids as well as finding solutions to improve resiliency after devastating natural disasters for areas located in the coastal regions in the Caribbean.

Preferred Student Qualifications: The posting is recommended for graduate and senior undergraduate students with dynamic simulation experience using Matlab and Simulink.

 

 

Project 3: Dynamic Modelling of Inverter Based Grid Support Functions in the context of standard UIA
PI: Dr. Eduardo I. Ortiz-Rivera & Dr. Erick Aponte-Bezares; Sandia Mentor: Dr. Rachid Darbali
The purpose of this project is to develop simplified dynamic models of inverters with dq axis control strategies incorporating various GSFs. Upon validation of the models, the goal is to evaluate the impact on UIA test dynamics under single or various GSFs and different aggressiveness settings. Results of the project will be presented in a format suitable for publication on applicable peer reviewed conference.

Preferred Student Qualifications: The posting is recommended for graduate and senior undergraduate students with dynamic simulation experience using Matlab and Simulink and linear control systems theory.

 


 

To apply in any of the programs listed above, click here (see Requirements and Application documents below).

Benefits

  • Participate in cutting-edge research.

  • Participate in technical and professional skills seminars.

  • Develop professional network.

  • Students will receive a stipend.

 

Requirements

  • Be a student in good standing.

  • GPA of 3.00/4.00.

  • Be an U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

  • Work under the direction and supervision of a faculty researcher.

  • Devote at least 10 hours per week to research activities as instructed by faculty researcher.

  • Prepare and submit a final presentation and a paper report.

  • Attend seminars as requested.

  • Present research results.

(Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

 

Application

  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.

  2. Copy of unofficial transcripts.

  3. Copy of officialized enrollment.

  4. 1-page CV/Resume

  5. 2 names and contact email of professor's references

 

Submit PDF or JPEG files of these documents, via the web application.
Documents and application must be submitted no later than Thursday, March 31, 2022.

 

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.

 

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