Overview

The goal of the Consortium of Hybrid Resilient Energy Systems (CHRES) is to increase workforce pipeline of graduates ready to pursue a career in DOE and other STEM related fields. CHRES directly supports DOE’s goal of building a sustainable professional and academic pipeline of next the next generation of engineers and scientist from the Hispanic community, ready to take on the challenges of current and future energy systems.  CHRES efforts are to provide a year-round and summer research, internships, and co-ops for undergraduate and graduate students.  

 

 

About Us

The consortium participants are Universidad Ana G Méndez-Gurabo (lead), Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayaguez, University of Texas-El Paso, University of New Mexico- Albuquerque, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).  

 

Project Objectives

  • Provide research and educational experiences to minority students  by  continuing  and improving  the  consortium  programs.
  • Increase  interaction between partners and between partners and national laboratories.
  • Encourage minority students to excel in science, technology, engineering and math by providing them with practical experience and training through project capacity building and learning experience.
  • Enlarge scientific, technical knowledge and resource base in the topics of resilient energy (engineering).
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Program Outcomes: 

  • Increase the number of students that perform research at all levels of participating institutions by 5% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the research products (paper, presentations) of minority students from partners by 5% in a five-year period).
  • Develop online courses related to field.
  • Increase the number of students participating in internships/direct hires at the National Laboratories by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of faculty members that work in/with the National Laboratories by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of technical visits from the National Laboratories to partner academic institutions by 10% in a five-year period.
  • Increase the number of MSI students obtain practical experiences in engineering topics by 5%in a five-year period.
  • Increase number of students hired into engineering careers related to NNSA/DOE by 5% in a five-year period.  
  • Impact and secondary schools’ student to create interest in STEM fields.
  • Implement strategies that will increase enthusiasm of potential students into STEM fields.
  • Increase the number of extracurricular and innovative activities focused on resilient energy systems topics, such as summer internships, summer camps, tours and energy day to attract and retain students.
  • Offer research and work opportunities related to STEM field that will benefit current students by continuing to motivate them on completing their academic path.
  • Arrange outreach and networking strategies directed to attract new students.
  • Provide career placement opportunities for students.
  • Provide opportunities for students to work at National Laboratories and partnering institutions.

 

 

 

Opportunities 2024

Apply for this program (High School Energy Summer Camp 2024) before Sunday, March 10, 2024.

 

Date: Mondays through Friday from June 3 to June 28, 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Four (4) weeks’ summer bridge program that will emphasize the development of competencies in energy systems with emphasis in resiliency and the challenges presented by human needs in the 21st century.  Students will have the opportunity of competing in the Engithlon Surviving Mode challenge.  There will be a prize for the team of students that develop the best idea to solve an energy related problem.

 

The application process is now open for 9th to 12th grade students. To apply click here (see Requirements and Application documents below).

Benefits

  • Prepare student for university work.
  • Exposition to formal courses (curricular component), seminars and workshops (Computer Programming, Digital Control (Arduino), Energy Analysis, Wind Energy and Photovoltaics).
  • Competition Participation: Engithlon Surviving Mode

    • The best idea from the energy area will be chosen

    • Award and certificate for the best idea


*No cost

 

Requirements

  • Be a student in good standing (students are not required to study engineering but should have an interest in sciences or engineering).
  • GPA (grade point average) of at least 2.50 / 4.0 ("por lo menos 2.50 de promedio acumulativo").

  • Must complete 6 hours, Monday through Friday during the internship from June (3) to June (28) (4 weeks = 19 days).

  • Attend all courses and seminars and be on-time and participative.
  • Prepare presentations in one topic of energy based on literature research.

  • Be an U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

(Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

 

Application

  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.

  2. Write a 1-page essay (must be in English, no less than 250 and no more than 500 words) discussing why do you want to participate in the High School Energy Summer Camp 2024, what do you expect to gain out of the experience, and how the experience will help you attain your academic goals and career plans.

  3. Copy of last Official transcripts (GPA evidence). You may submit the unofficial or official transcript to May 2023 and/or December 2023.

  4. Parents need to sign authorization for the student’s participation.

  5. Open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. Attach one of the following: birth certificate, passport and/or naturalization certificate (if foreign national).

  6. Complete the Application for Admission for the creation of a special student ID.

  7. Complete the Application for Admission and the Relay of Photos, Videos, Others .

 

Submit PDF files of these documents, via the web application.
Documents and application must be submitted no later than Sunday, March 10, 2024.

 

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.

 

 

Summer Research Internship Program

Apply for the Summer Research Internship Program before Sunday, April 21, 2024.

Benefits:
  • Participate in cutting-edge research.
  • Participate in technical and professional skills seminars.
  • Develop professional network.
  • Students will receive a stipend.

Requirements:
  • Be a student in good standing.
  • Be an active student at the undergraduate and/or graduate level.
  • GPA of 3.00/4.00.
  • Work under the direction and supervision of a faculty researcher.
  • Work at least 15 hours per week undergraduate students in research activities as instructed by the research professor (6 weeks).
  • Work at least 20 hours per week graduate students in research activities as instructed by the research professor (6 weeks).Prepare and submit a final presentation and a paper report.
  • Attend seminars as requested.
  • Present research results.
  • Be an U.S. citizen or permanent resident. (Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

Application:
  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.
  2. Copy of unofficial transcripts.
  3. Copy of officialized enrollment.
  4. 1-page CV/Resume
  5. References (2) from professors (include names and contact email).
  6. Open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. Attach one of the following: birth certificate, passport and/or naturalization certificate (if foreign national).

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.
Submit PDF or JPEG files of these documents, via the web application.

Documents and application must be submitted no later than Sunday, April 21, 2024.

Universidad Ana G. Méndez Recinto de Gurabo
Project 1: Low-Cost Micro Wind Turbine Control System with Monitoring and Braking Capabilities
Mentor: Professor Diego A. Aponte Roa, PhD - Electrical Engineering
Description: The demand for renewable energy has increased in recent years, including the market for micro wind turbines. However, low-cost products lack a proper control system and advanced features. This project aims to design, test, and develop a Low-Cost Micro Wind Turbine Control System with Monitoring and Braking Capabilities using off-the-shelf components. The major challenge addressed in this work is to include all the control electronics in a single PCB to generate a plug & play board. In addition, the real time monitoring system requires being accurate and reliable. To achieve these goals, different testing experiments will validate the proposed control architecture and monitoring system.
Preferred student qualifications: The ideal candidate should be a Computer Engineering Student with knowledge in Python, SQL, and C++ (Arduino microcontroller). Basic knowledge in electronics is also desired.

Project 2: Fabrication of a Pitch Controlled, Small-Scale Wind Turbine with Mechanical Braking
Mentor: Professor Albert A. Espinoza, Mechanical Engineering
Description: This project focuses on conducting a series of mechanical, aerodynamic, and electrical tests to characterize the power generation and safety capabilities of a small-scale wind turbine designed and built in-house at UAGM-Gurabo. The data gathered from these studies will be used to validate a novel, integrated wind turbine generator design methodology proposed by the researchers. Additionally, the team also aims to improve upon the current manufacturing limitations of creating low-cost wind turbine generator prototypes from scratch and without specialized equipment.
Preferred student qualifications: Knowledge of MATLAB/Simulink, SolidWorks, and Mechanical Design Methodology, Machine shop experience not required, but preferred.


Project 3: Explore the creation of microgrids using photovoltaic systems installed on the roofs of residences, against the actual grid in Puerto Rico
Mentor: Professor Miguel A. Goenaga Jimenez, PhD - Electrical Engineering
Description: The goal of this proje¬ct is to create and deve¬lop a solar-powered micro grid that efficie¬ntly and sustainably meets the e¬nergy needs of a spe¬cific community in Puerto Rico. It ensures the¬ micro grid stays connected to the main powe¬r grid. This promotes reliability, efficie¬ncy, and adding more solar energy. The¬ main goal reflects the ove¬rall plan for designing the micro grid. This includes unde¬rstanding how much energy is nee¬ded, optimizing the solar panels, building the¬ micro grid system, connecting it to the main grid, managing it, te¬sting it, and constantly checking it. Real data from pilot communities chose¬n by LUMA and AEE will be used in this process. The¬ results will spread knowledge¬ about the benefits of solar syste¬ms in hybrid micro grids with AC and DC power. It will model differe¬nt situations combining various renewable e¬nergy sources.
Preferred student qualifications: The student should have knowledge in basic programming and skills in handling a new programming language (MatLab, Python, etc.). They will explore the use of new software for modeling photovoltaic systems and micro grids, combining various dispersed energy sources. Additionally, basic knowledge in power systems such as AC and DC networks, active and complex power calculations in power systems, load synchronization, charge controllers, and inverters.

Project 4: Study of Pole’s Lateral Support and Dead-end Dreakaways as Alternatives to Mitigate Electrical Distribution Blackout as a Result of a High Energy Storm with the mentor
Mentor: Professor Hermes Calderón Arteaga, PhD - Civil Engineering
Description: The recent history of hurricanes hitting the Island has shown the fragility of its energy system. The long-term blackouts after the impact of hurricanes Maria and Fiona remark the need to improve the energy system to resist the pass of a higher category hurricane. It requires revising the design and operation conditions of the utility poles that sustains the distribution infrastructure, particularly concrete poles, which were one of the main failures of the system. The study will focus on the load analysis of a typical electrical distribution pole used in Puerto Rico. Lateral Support and dead-end breakaways will be studied as alternatives to mitigate the domino effect, one of the main causes of a long-term blackout.
Preferred student qualifications: (Non-strict) Student with interest in structures. Problem solver, team oriented with good communication and commitment to research (time and energy to the project).

Project 5: Assessment of Energy efficiency using pervious concrete
Mentor: Professor Luz E. Torres Molina, PhD - Civil Engineering
Description: Pervious concrete is usually used in pavement. It is a porous urban surface composed of open pore pavers and concrete with an underlying stone reservoir. Pervious pavement catches precipitation and surface runoff, storing it in the reservoir while slowly allowing it to infiltrate the soil below or discharge via a drain. The most common uses of permeable pavement are parking lots, low-traffic roads, sidewalks, and driveways. Some advantages of using Permeable pavements are; they help reestablish a more natural hydrologic balance and reduce runoff volume by trapping and slowly releasing precipitation into the ground instead of allowing it to flow into storm drains and out to receiving waters as effluent. This process also reduces the peak discharge rates by preventing large, fast pulses of precipitation through the storm water system. Preferred student qualifications: Knowledge in construction materials, concrete, determination of atmospheric factors, civil engineering.

Project 6: Enhancing Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction for Fuel Cells with Nanodroplet-Mediated Electrodeposition of CuFeOx Alloy Electrocatalysts
Mentor: Professor Joshua Reyes Morales, PhD - Chemistry
Description: In the context of growing energy demands and the limitations of non-renewable resources like petroleum, fuel cells emerge as a promising alternative for clean energy production, utilizing abundant elements such as hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen, in particular, is a potent energy source, releasing significant energy through chemical or electrochemical reactions. However, the most effective catalyst for these reactions, platinum (Pt), is expensive, prompting the search for cost-effective alternatives. This study investigates the synthesis of nanomaterials through Nano droplet-mediated electrodeposition of CuFeOx for the enhancement of electro catalytic activity in the anode of a fuel cell. This technique is notable for its efficiency and ability to produce high-quality nanomaterials, even from costly metal salts. The research focuses on electrodepositing CuFeOx alloy electro catalysts using this method, inspired by literature that highlights the synergistic effects of CuFeOx alloys in facilitating hydrogen molecule dissociation and efficient electron transfer, thereby enhancing catalytic activity.
Preferred student qualifications: Knowledge in natural sciences or at least a strong interest in learning in this area is required. Additionally, knowledge of or interest in electrochemical measurements for electro catalytic reactions related to fuel cells is desirable.

Project 7: Optimization of the Portable Power Station with Several Source of Energy for Emergencies
Mentor: Professor Daniel E. Mera Romo, PhD - Electrical Engineering
Description: After hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, many people were affected, and others died because they were unable to power up their vital medical equipment. One of the causes was that Puerto Rico's electrical grid is not resilient due to lack of maintenance and updating. This project focuses on optimizing a portable hybrid generator for emergencies based on solar, wind and mechanical energy. This is an excellent opportunity to develop your talents and engineering skills by designing, building and putting this device into operation. In this project theory and practice merge.
Preferred student qualifications: Aimed at electrical engineering students who have taken circuit and electronics classes and laboratories. Programming skill are preferred. You need to be proactive and eager to learn.

Project 8: Emerging 2D Nanomaterials for Advancing Anode Fabrication in Lithium-Ion Batteries (LIBs)
Mentor: Professor Francisco J. Díaz Castro, PhD - Physical
Description: Currently, batteries play a crucial role in energy storage due to their ability to hold high energy densities compared to other power sources. To meet the growing demands, it is essential to develop novel materials and chemical processes capable of providing higher energy density, greater power density, and longer operational lifespans. However, the increasing global energy demand calls for further advancements in lithium-ion battery (LIB) materials. In this context, our research team conducts a comprehensive investigation into the diverse potential applications of various two-dimensional (2D) materials, combined with their integration alongside other nanomaterials, to enhance anode electrode performance in LIBs. Our primary objective is to synthesize cutting-edge 2D materials that will serve as the foundation for high-performance LIBs. Additionally, we will perform computer simulations using first-principle calculations to estimate properties such as band gap, adsorption sites, diffusion barriers, and capacity for these 2D materials.
Preferred student qualifications: Interested students must be enrolled in either the engineering or the chemistry program. They must have knowledge in using computers with Windows, Linux or UNIX and have completed at least Chemistry I.


Summer Exchange Program Projects 2024

Apply for the Summer Exchange Program before Sunday, April 21, 2024.

Benefits:
  • Participate in cutting-edge research.
  • Participate in technical and professional skills seminars.
  • Develop professional network.
  • Students will receive a stipend.

Requirements:
  • Be a student in good standing.
  • Be an active student at the undergraduate and/or graduate level.
  • GPA of 3.00/4.00.
  • Work under the direction and supervision of a faculty researcher.
  • 8 weeks -The hours of dedication to research vary according to the university institution and will be informed in the letter of acceptance.
  • Prepare and submit a final presentation and a paper report.
  • Attend seminars as requested.
  • Present research results.
  • Be an U.S. citizen or permanent resident. (Continued support is subjected to performance evaluations.)

Application:
  1. Fill out the 1-page application form here.
  2. Copy of unofficial transcripts.
  3. Copy of officialized enrollment.
  4. 1-page CV/Resume
  5. References (2) from professors (include names and contact email).
  6. Open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. Attach one of the following: birth certificate, passport and/or naturalization certificate (if foreign national).

Submit any questions to Mrs. Gloribel Rivera at: glrivera@uagm.edu or Mrs. Darlene Muñoz at: damunoz@uagm.edu.
Submit PDF or JPEG files of these documents, via the web application.

Documents and application must be submitted no later than Sunday, April 21, 2024.


Universidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Mayagüez, PR (UPRM)
Project 1: Control of Hybrid Power System
UPRM Mentors: Dr. Eduardo Ortiz-Rivera & Dr. Erick Aponte-Bezares
Description: The Consortium of Hybrid Resilient Energy Systems (CHRES) requires the services of a review and researching about specify project related to Control of Hybrid Power System. It is addressed to students doing bachelor’s or graduate degree studies (i.e. master or Ph.D.) at either CHRES partner academic institution (i.e. UTEP, UAGM, UNM or UPRM). The guidelines for summer employment are required by the following list:
• Intermediate knowledge of dynamic state-space representation and its functionalities.
• Intermediate knowledge of Microsoft Word, Power Point, MATLAB and Simulink.
• Intermediate knowledge of writing projects in English.
• Intermediate knowledge in Control Systems is a must.
• Available to work in-class and/or online, 40 hours per week (8 hours every day).
• Bilingual: English/Spanish.
• GPA of at least 3.0/ 4.0.
• Work under the direction and supervision of a UPRM CHRES's staff member.
• Be an U.S. citizen.

Project 2: Dynamic Modelling of Grid Forming Inverters using Power Hardware In The Loop (PHIL)
Mentor: Eng. Zeeshan Akhtar
Description: This project aims to develop simplified dynamic models and simulations of Grid Forming Inverters (GFMI). The goal is to develop and validate Grid Forming Inverters using Power Hardware In The Loop (PHIL). Results of the project will be presented in a format suitable for publication on applicable peer reviewed conference.
Preferred Student Qualifications: The posting is recommended for graduate and senior undergraduate students with dynamic simulation experience using Matlab and Simulink, power electronics, and linear control systems theory.



University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
Project 1: Cyber Resilience of Energy Systems Using Real Time Digital Simulation.
Mentor: Professor Ali Bidram (Electrical and Computer Engineering Department).
Preferred student qualifications: Mechanical Engineer, Computer Engineer or Electrical Engineer, Junior, Senior or Graduate student level

Project 2: Energy Harvesting: Developing increased frequency bandwidth of kinetic energy harvesting devices. The work will focus on designing (CAD) of a novel proof mass, developing the proof mass, and experimental validation of the concept using a piezoelectric cantilever energy harvester.
Mentor: Professor Nathan Jackson. (Mechanical Engineering Department)
Preferred student qualifications: Mechanical, Electrical Engineer with CAD experience.

Project 3: Thermal Radiation Analysis in Ceramic Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine Engines
Mentor: George Koutsakis (Mechanical Engineering Department)
Preferred student qualifications: Mechanical, Electrical Engineer. Junior, Senior or graduate student level.

Project 4: Characterization of Quantum Dots for High Performance Solar Cells
Mentor: Professor Ganesh Balakrishnan. (Electrical & Computer Engineering Department)
Preferred student qualifications: Electrical, Chemical, Mechanical Engineer, Physics. Senior or Graduate student level.

Project 5: Hybrid Energy Systems for Remote Wireless Sensors
Mentor: Professor Fernando Moreu (Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering Department, joint appointment in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering)
Preferred student qualifications: Electrical, Mechanical, Civil Engineer. Senior or Graduate student level

Project 6: Development of Materials for Solar Cells
Mentor: Professor Francesca Cavallo (Electrical and Computer Engineering Department) and Research Scientist Emma Renteria (Center for High Technology Materials)
Preferred student qualifications: Electrical, Chemical, Mechanical Engineers. Junior, Senior or Graduate level who have some experience in Semiconductors.

Project 7: Power Systems Protection and Control
Mentor: Professor Ramiro Jordan (Electrical & Computer Engineering Department)
Preferred student qualifications: Electrical, Mechanical, Computer Engineers. Junior, Senior or graduate student level.

Project 8: Hydrogen and Fuel cell, batteries and super capacitors.
Mentor: Professor Sakineh Chabi (Mechanical Engineering Department)
Preferred student qualifications: Mechanical Engineers. Senior or Graduate level


University of Texas-El Paso, Texas (UTEP)
Project 1: Nanocontainers Based on Surface Active Ionic Liquids for Chemical Separations In this project, the structure of ionic liquid-based nanometer-sized containers (micelles, or reverse micelles) will be investigated. The researcher will learn about the conditions required to form the nanostructures, their stability, and ability to carry a hydrophobic or hydrophilic cargo.
Preferred Student qualifications (not strict): Biophysics, physics, biochemistry, chemistry, chemical engineering, materials science

Project 2: Mineral Nucleation and Growth in Nanopores and Planar Interfaces In this project, the student researcher will expose mineral oxide materials to different environmental conditions to determine which parameters improve the efficiency of an atmospheric CO2-capturing system meant to work for many repeated cycles. X-ray scattering experiments will be used to track the evolution of nano- and atomic structure as new mineral phases form on the surfaces of the materials of interest.
Preferred Student qualifications (not strict): Geochemistry, physics, chemical/mechanical/civil engineering.

Project 3: Investigating Thermal Cycling Effects on Nanostructure in Polymers for Advanced Manufacturing In this project, the researcher will use x-ray scattering and mechanical testing results to understand how thermal cycling near critical transition temperatures affect the properties of polymers. Comparisons between materials prepared by injection molding vs selective laser sintering, and between different chemical compositions will be carried out.
Preferred Student qualifications (not strict): chemical/mechanical engineering, physics, materials science

Project 4: Given new focus on additively manufacturing flow devices for a variety of chemical processes supporting actinide material processing. we would like data pertaining to the solvent and radiation compatibility of these proposed materials. Tests of interest would include, but are not limited to, understanding degrading mechanical properties (e.g., elastic moduli, ultimate tensile strength, creep), chemical reactivity (e.g., leaching of chemicals from the printed material into the solvents, swelling of the part material by the solvents), and radiation integrity (e.g., degradation of the mechanical properties listed above under LANL-defined environments or radiation doses, off-gassing produced during irradiation). Specifically, the initial study will focus on the environment including but not limited to: chemical solvents of 6M Nitric Acid, 6M HCl, Dodecane, Xylenes, 10% Acetone/H2O. A list of commercially available printable materials such as Formlabs clear V4 resin will be of interest.

 

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